Welcome to OII Australia

Intersex people are born with physical sex characteristics that don’t fit medical norms for female or male bodies. We have diverse bodies, sexes, genders, identities and life experiences.

OII Australia is a national body by and for people with intersex variations. We promote human rights and bodily autonomy for intersex people, and provide information, education and peer support.

Our goals are to help create a society where intersex bodies are not stigmatised, and where our rights as people are recognised.
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Intersex Awareness Day talk at UTS: “Thinking outside the box”

IAD2016 talk at UTS

On 26 October, Intersex Awareness Day, co-chair Morgan Carpenter will be giving a talk at UTS entitled “Intersex, thinking outside the box: intersex, identity, harmful practices and 20 years of activism.” Date: Wednesday 26 October, 2016 Time: 12 to 1pm Location: CB08.02.002 (the Dr Chau Chak Wing Building) RSVP to spence.messih@uts.edu.au Morgan Carpenter is a…
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Body shaming is an intersex issue

Allowed?

Please note that this post contains distressing images. It intersperses quotations about intersex infants and children with quotations about the bodies of public figures. Body shaming is an intersex issue, perhaps even more than any other issue. It stunts people’s lives and provides rationales for harmful medical interventions. If you want to know why openly…
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Reporting on the Olympics

London Olympics by Farrukh, CC by NC 2.0

Much of the reporting on some women athletes participating in the Rio Olympics is insupportable. It makes assumptions about their bodies, sex, gender identity and expressions that is deeply concerning. Much reporting fails to acknowledge the lack of scientific evidence for body policing by sporting institutions, and the deep personal cost of such assumptions, which…
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Intersex human rights: addressing harmful practices and rhetoric of change

Reproductive Health Matters

OII Australia co-chair Morgan Carpenter has been published in the peer-reviewed scientific journal Reproductive Health Matters. Here is the article abstract: Intersex people and bodies have been considered incapable of integration into society. Medical interventions on often healthy bodies remain the norm, addressing perceived familial and cultural demands, despite concerns about necessity, outcomes, conduct and…
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LGBTI sponsorship and the elimination of intersex traits

Source: Pixabay, creative commons

The sponsorship of LGBTI events by IVF businesses raises ethical issues not just about the elimination of intersex traits, but also about the nature of community and comprehension of issues relating to intersex bodily diversity. Several recent conferences and events in Australia have included sponsorship or presentations by IVF businesses, promoting their services in family…
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